Ethanol in petrol.

  1. edwin Enthusiast

    Messages:
    80
    Location:
    Lichfield
    Gentlemen. I am becoming aware that ethanol in petrol "absorbs" water condensation in the petrol tank, and then when the car is left standing during winter lay off, the water can be released and it sinks to the bottom of the tank where it corrodes the tank. I have been looking at solutions to this, and found that ESSO super unleaded 97 octane is ethanol free, and therefore obviously higher octane, but no ethanol problems.
    Does anyone know of any other ethanol free petrol. Is anyone using an anti ethanol additive?

    Any comments on the matter would be most helpful. Edwin
     
    Richnd1974 likes this.
  2. mojobaby

    mojobaby Enthusiast

    Messages:
    1,070
    Location:
    Lot et Garonne France
    Hi Edwin, our cars are not meant to use ethanol. You're right about the water, it can cause a lot of damage within the engine as well. It separates the water from the fuel.

    We have 95 or 98 unleaded where I live in the south of France, but further North E10 fuel is available as well.. (might be E15, I can't remember which)

    I was about to say, "if you have a choice, then use 97 Unleaded" , but that's also incorrect. Ethanol should be avoided completely, there is no choice to be made.
    Don't know what's going to happen in the future. Ethanol is less polluting and that's why it's being pushed.
     
  3. edwin Enthusiast

    Messages:
    80
    Location:
    Lichfield
    Thanks for the reply. I keep my car in Martel, just south of Brive. They have 95 and 97 octane there, and then we have the bio stuff on the route to the tunnel. I am trying to understand the exact situation, and then get the right additive, here in the UK, and take it over with me next trip. I have a pal in the petrol business and he is researching this for me so i hope to post my findings for everyones benefit. I have a 1966 MGB as well, but it had an SS tank so not affected. It may be that I get an ss tank for the R4 as well. Regards
     
  4. retrospecparts Enthusiast

    Messages:
    110
    Location:
    West Sussex
    Although a stainless steel tank won't corrode, the water will still accumulate at the bottom of the tank, where the pick-up will suck it up and cause running problems.
    Also, it's not just the fuel tank that ethanol adversely affects. It can eat fuel hoses and internal components of the carburettor and fuel pump.
     
    mojobaby likes this.
  5. edwin Enthusiast

    Messages:
    80
    Location:
    Lichfield
    I lived in Canada in the 80's, and there you added Ethanol to the petrol so that it absorbed water condensation, which then passed through the fuel line under the car without freezing, and burned in the combustion process. In the winter at -40 you were more interested in the car working, so water in the tank meant possible water freezing in the exposed fuel line under the car, blocking the fuel line, and the motor stopping unexpectedly and being stranded.
     
  6. edwin Enthusiast

    Messages:
    80
    Location:
    Lichfield

    Gentlemen, an update
    After my request to BP for info re avoiding Ethanol, BP have sent this not very helpful reply :-

    "I would like to kindly inform you that unfortunately BP does not endorse the use of aftermarket fuels additives therefore cannot comment on their use.

    Our best ever dirt-busting Ultimate fuels are specially designed to fight dirt in all on-road engine technologies. Provided your engine is designed to run on automotive fuels meeting current legislative standards, you can enjoy using BP Ultimate fuels with ACTIVE technology no matter what you drive - old or new, large or small.

    In terms of advice relating of prevention of “phase separation” of water and ethanol phase in an old vehicles fuel, there are numerous theories on the most appropriate approach some say fill the tank to reduce the likelihood others prefer to remove the fuels during winter. If the car is kept and maintained in a constant temperature environment then this phenomena is significantly less likely to occur however we realise this is not always possible. Ordinarily gasoline containing ethanol is stable and only if introduced to a source of water such as condensation or other type of water ingress will the products separate. Keeping a fuel tank full over winter storage reduces the vapour space and eliminates surface area for condensates to form so can offer some protection.

    I would however urge further research by classic car groups to ascertain the most appropriate course of action in this case."

    We will continue to look for the answer.
     
  7. edwin Enthusiast

    Messages:
    80
    Location:
    Lichfield
    Gentlemen, I have been on to the FBHVC web site and they have a whole section on this topic and after testing various additives, they recommend Flexolite Ethanolmate. Its about £7.50 a bottle and £15 per bottle (inc postage and vat) that treats 250 litres of fuel. There are stockists in a few locations around the country where you can buy it when passing and save postage.
    Sales@flexolite.co.uk
    01722 712 829
    Hope its of help.
     
  8. retrospecparts Enthusiast

    Messages:
    110
    Location:
    West Sussex
    Which size bottle treats 250 litres?
     
  9. edwin Enthusiast

    Messages:
    80
    Location:
    Lichfield
    Apparently, according to Flexolite themselves, the 250ml bottle does 250 litres, so around 7 tankfuls for an R4.
     
Advertisements
Clementine's Garage
Clementine's
Renault 4 Garage
Clementine the Cat
 
Image of flower
Yellow R4
 
Réparateur d'automobiles