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My Emergency Car Tool Kit

mojobaby

Enthusiast
Messages
1,109
#1
I have a small plastic box tucked away underneath my seat with the most common tools that I use.

I could of course buy a second socket set, but these are all duplicate spanners thats why they're all different shapes and sizes.

I suppose I could also carry a spare set of points, condenser, rotor, distributer cap, plugs etc, but where do you stop?

I also have battery jumper cables under the other seat.

Please add to my list if you think it's important:)

Distributer: Spanners 7, 10, 11 and screw drivers.
Carburetor: Spanners 7, 11, 10 and 8 for choke cable
General: Spanners 12 and 13
Feeler gauge
Set of fuses (never used in 15 years)
Sandpaper for points cleaning

It would be interesting to hear what else you all carry for emergencies.

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JdeW

Enthusiast
Messages
328
Location
Laarbeek, The Netherlands
#2
Hopefully not but a towing cable might be usefull...of course only if there is absolutely no other possibility...
My neighbor helped me out last year...what a shame...:ashamed:
 

mojobaby

Enthusiast
Messages
1,109
#3
Hopefully, that will never be necessary, but it pays to be prepared. I have 2 roof rack straps that I keep in my front door pockets, I wonder if they would be strong enough?

Of course there's always the chance that I might tow someone else who has broken down:)
 
Messages
238
#4
I'd suggest a telescopic wheel-brace, for loosening those obstinate wheel nuts on your (or another's) car. They weigh little, compress to half their extended length and you can buy a selection of wheel nut sizes, if needed. I agree that a suitable tow rope's a valuable addition, too. A set of bulbs (45/40 watt headlamp bulbs, 5 & 21 watt for side & brake/indicators) weigh next to nothing & the up little space.

Is that brass screw-driver a 3-in-1 set? My late Father In Law had one and I now have it in my tool box and find it very useful (together with happy memories of him whenever I use it!)
 

Neil

Enthusiast
Messages
210
Location
llangennech
#5
" ..... BUT WHERE DO YOU STOP?"

You're right Mo, where does one stop?
If we choose to carry a second spare wheel, do we risk being labelled as paranoid?
I endorse everything itemized above, and as Quatrelle owners, we are blessed with the cubic capacity to lug those little extras that instil peace of mind.
I regard Andrew's telescopic brace as a "must", and we should all lower the spare down once a year, grease the threads, then re-tighten.

We've reached that time of year when a multi-function lantern tops my list.
Also, a few metres of galvanised wire to strap-up a broken exhaust;
A few metres of low amp cable to get you home in the event of loom-failure (lights or ignition)

Looking forward to your additional suggestions in time for our next R4 journey mid-December, Algarve to Carmarthenshire,
thanks,
N.
 

mojobaby

Enthusiast
Messages
1,109
#6
Thanks Andrew for reminding me about the bulbs. Apparently its a law in France, you have to carry a spare set, although I never have. While i was in town this morning I decided to buy a set, but then I forgot the size 45/40, so it will have to wait until next time.
That law doesn't make complete sense. The Renault 4's are fine, but to change globes in any modern car you need to have an engineering degree.

and the little brass screw driver is really useful, given to me by my English neighbour when he returned to the UK. I wish that I had a complete set.
 

mojobaby

Enthusiast
Messages
1,109
#7
Thank you Neil for your suggestions.
A lantern is a great idea and in an emergency I think that most cell phones these days have flash lights built into them.
I already carry 5 meters of nylon cord in the front door pockets and will be adding a few meters of galvanised wire. It can also be used to make a hose clamp, but then I'd probably have to carry a pair of pliers.:)
 
Messages
238
#8
Thanks Andrew for reminding me about the bulbs. Apparently its a law in France, you have to carry a spare set, although I never have. While i was in town this morning I decided to buy a set, but then I forgot the size 45/40, so it will have to wait until next time.
That law doesn't make complete sense.
We go to France regularly (albeit in a Citroën Xantia!) and always make sure we have the vi-vis jackets, fire extinguisher, hazard triangle & bulb set ready for inspection, should Les Gendarmes wish to take a look! If you're going in the 4, might I suggest a couple of 60/55 watt "410" halogen bulbs? They have the same circular fitting that the normal 45/40 watt bulbs have, but give the increased brightness of the halogen 60/55 bulbs (and can be fitted with 'selective' yellow covers, giving that authentic "French" look!) PM me if you can't find them and I'll point you in the way of a supplier.
 

mojobaby

Enthusiast
Messages
1,109
#9
Hi Andrew, thanks, I need to get a fire extinguisher. My list is growing! I need another little tool box for the extras.

Since the beginning of the year, a breathalyzer test kit is also compulsory. You need 2 of them and they're readily available at most supermarkets. (LeClerc/Auchan)

I live in France permanently (ex-South African) so won't be able to get the bulbs from your supplier, but thanks for the info and I'll try to find them here. I used to have yellow 45/40 bulbs and would like to go that route again but as I live way out in the country, a brighter bulb would be welcome
 

Neil

Enthusiast
Messages
210
Location
llangennech
#10
Hi Andrew, thanks, I need to get a fire extinguisher. My list is growing! I need another little tool box for the extras.

Since the beginning of the year, a breathalyzer test kit is also compulsory. You need 2 of them and they're readily available at most supermarkets. (LeClerc/Auchan)

I live in France permanently (ex-South African) so won't be able to get the bulbs from your supplier, but thanks for the info and I'll try to find them here. I used to have yellow 45/40 bulbs and would like to go that route again but as I live way out in the country, a brighter bulb would be welcome
Sorry Mo, I'm not sure I have the very latest on this .......

WHAT A SUPERB EXAMPLE OF EUROPEAN NONSENSE!
Drive your vehicle in France;
You are not carrying a device to measure "breath alcohol content";
You are in breach of French traffic law;
Routine check at roadside;
Le Bobby issues a written penalty;
The wife rifles through her handbag to raise the cash;
Le Bobby recites E.U. directive stating that enforcement officers are prohibited under E.U. law from collecting Le Fine!!

HOW LONG WILL IT BE BEFORE IT BECOMES AN OFFENCE TO CARRY ABOVE ITEM IN YOUR GLOVE-BOX ??

http://www.drive-france.com/faqs/france-breathalyzer-law/

https://www.honestjohn.co.uk/forum/post/index.htm?t=105781

N.
 
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mojobaby

Enthusiast
Messages
1,109
#11
The blood alcohol limit in France is 0,5, which is about 2 glasses of wine. The fine for being over the limit is incredibly high so just carry those breathalyzer test kits, whether you use them or not.
An on the spot fine means that you have 3 days to pay it.

What about this one.........if you wear glasses, you have to carry a spare in the car. When you see an optician advertising glasses for XX Euros and 50% discount on the second pair, that's the reason. I'm sure it wouldn't apply to foreign visitors and I can't see the Gendarmes asking to see your spare set.
 

Piet

Enthusiast
Messages
108
#12
Here's what else I carry when on interstate trips:-
spanners 14, 17 and 19 (they're common Renault sizes)
Renault sump/gearbox/brake 10mm square innie/outie spanner
adjustable spanner small
adjustable spanner large
decent normal and needle nose pliers
plug spanner
mole grips
selection of phillips and flat screwdrivers
ball joint splitter
3mm and 5mm roll pin punches (for early driveshafts)
top and bottom hose
fan and alternator belts
clutch cable
fencing wire
gaffer tape
silicone sealant
oil and coolant
 

mojobaby

Enthusiast
Messages
1,109
#13
Hello Piet
Very pleased to see "gaffer tape" mentioned. What would we do without it.

I've heard about the highways in Australia that go on and on for miles and days. But you seem very well prepared. I can understand why you would carry hoses as well as coolant.

How do you feel about the puncture repair aerosol cans? The kind that spray some kind of liquid into the tyre to seal any holes. I'm not sure if it only works on tubeless?
Being stranded with a flat as well as a flat spare tyre seems unlikely, but stranger things have happened.
 

Neil

Enthusiast
Messages
210
Location
llangennech
#14
Second pair of spectacles for the vehicle driver is obligatory in Portugal and Spain regardless of nationality.
P.S.
and don't forget vehicle nationality I.D. unless incorporated within rear number plate,

Good Luck
 
Messages
483
Location
Cheltenham
#15
Hi Mojobaby
I'd be too embarrassed to give you a list of all the bits and pieces I carry about, particularly on long trips! One of the great things about the F6 is the toolbox behind the seats - also one of its disadvantages, as you can never open it if the van's in holiday mode...
I always take a spare set of points and a condenser - I've had problems twice with broken points, once with a Femsa distributor (fiddly), and once with a Ducellier (much easier, particularly with the non-externally adjustable system).
I'd also recommend taking a spare needle valve - I've had a couple of these fail over the years. I find that a plastic golf tee is a good way to plug the fuel pipe if you ever need to disconnect it.
I've found the tyre aerosols really good on tubeless tyres - definitely worth carrying one.
Some thick wire for temporary exhaust repairs when the bobbins go is also useful!
 

ggcton

Enthusiast
Messages
488
Location
Grimoldby Lincolnshire
#16
Hi Mojobaby
I'd be too embarrassed to give you a list of all the bits and pieces I carry about, particularly on long trips! One of the great things about the F6 is the toolbox behind the seats - also one of its disadvantages, as you can never open it if the van's in holiday mode...
I always take a spare set of points and a condenser - I've had problems twice with broken points, once with a Femsa distributor (fiddly), and once with a Ducellier (much easier, particularly with the non-externally adjustable system).
I'd also recommend taking a spare needle valve - I've had a couple of these fail over the years. I find that a plastic golf tee is a good way to plug the fuel pipe if you ever need to disconnect it.
I've found the tyre aerosols really good on tubeless tyres - definitely worth carrying one.
Some thick wire for temporary exhaust repairs when the bobbins go is also useful!
Keep your car well serviced and carry an AA/RaC card.It is getting very dangerous to undertake roadside repairs these days.I always carry spare glasses once I ran over mine when I dropped them and anothertime in Spain a frame broke.It would have been a long drive home without them.
 

Neil

Enthusiast
Messages
210
Location
llangennech
#17
Hello Piet
Very pleased to see "gaffer tape" mentioned. What would we do without it.

I've heard about the highways in Australia that go on and on for miles and days. But you seem very well prepared. I can understand why you would carry hoses as well as coolant.

How do you feel about the puncture repair aerosol cans? The kind that spray some kind of liquid into the tyre to seal any holes. I'm not sure if it only works on tubeless?
Being stranded with a flat as well as a flat spare tyre seems unlikely, but stranger things have happened.
Aerosol tyre repair products are great for 99% of us. But it has to be regarded as a "get-you-home" fix if you have treated your R4 to a posh set of alloys. Straight down to your friendly tyre depot next day to flush it all away before it can attack the aluminium. Your man will also perform a conventional repair.
N.
 
Messages
93
Location
Tuscany (Italy)
#18
Honestly, I carry too much tools in my car.
Precious partner is a toolbox with socket wrench and sockets in many sizes.
Then another toolbox with spanners, allen keys, screwdrivers, iron wire, flexible wire (like the one for bicycles brakes), cable ties, tape and some spares like a set o points, some fuses and some bulbs.
Obviously high visibiliy jacket and fire extinguisher, but those are in front of the passenger, ready to be used.
In winter I also carry a set of snow chains.
For this reason my car doubles its weight :laughing:
 
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